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Case Studies and Examples

SADC Groundwater Management Institute completes development of SADC-wide framework for Groundwater Data Collection and Management

"While the importance of groundwater in the SADC region can never be under estimated, one of the key limitations to its effective and sustainable management is the lack of decision making information, which is traced back to the lack of good quality groundwater data among the Member States. In response to the current groundwater challenges, SADC-GMI is currently implementing the Sustainable Groundwater Management in SADC Member States project; a project supported by the World Bank with funding from the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and Cooperation in International Waters in Africa Trust Fund (CIWA).

The project comprises four main components.  Under Component B: (Enhancing institutional capacity of governments in SADC Member States and transboundary organizations) and Component C: (Improving availability of and access to knowledge, scientific research and data on groundwater) of the GEF funded project, SADC-GMI implemented the “Capacity Building on Groundwater Data Collection and Management in SADC Member States (DataCoM) project."

Read more in Engineering News

Education launches hygiene, sanitation initiative

“It’s a full programme, where we are training the teachers. So, it’s accredited teachers to train all the children about that importance. It’s about the importance of washing their hands five times a day with Lifebuoy. After every, meal after going to the bathroom, so on and so forth. It’s about the importance of having good hygiene with brushing their teeth twice a day; it’s about the importance of having proper sanitation in the toilets of the school improve the facilities. It’s shocking that we have so many schools that still don’t have access to proper toilets. So far, we’ve been improving and putting proper toilets in 27 schools.”

Read more on SABC News

Mvula – Improving Water Supply and Sanitation

"The Mvula Trust is a dynamic, innovative and professional water supply and sanitation non-governmental organization (NGO). With 15 years of experience, Mvula has established itself as the leading water and sanitation services delivery NGO. The added value that Mvula brings as an NGO is our impresssive track-record and expertise in working with poor communities and facilitating service delivery partnerships between these communities and their municipalities. We offer a professional and efficient service to our clients, together with a non-profit, people centred commitment to the communities we serve."

Read more about the projects of The Mvula Trust

 

The Msunduzi Duct pollution monitoring, maintenance and community education project

"The Msunduzi Duct pollution monitoring, maintenance and community education project had four key purposes

  • To clear sewer lines and eradicate alien invasive plants
  • To monitor the sewer lines and report spillages
  • To reveal long abandoned or neglected manholes that have not been seen for long periods of time
  • And to educate communities and schools about waste water and sanitation.

Data gathered by the project team and reflected throughout the print report and most notably in the ‘Stories of change” section suggest that not only have the outcomes been met but in many cases these have been exceeded. Education and infrastructure development together have been integral to the success of the project."

Read more about the project on duct.org.za

Dry Toilets: An Approach to Provide Safe Sanitation and Sustainable Sewage Treatment?

"According to the 2019 World Water Development Report (WWDR), only two out of five people across the globe had access to safely managed sanitation services in 2015 (World Water Assessment Programme (WWAP 2019)). Combined with the increasing risk of water scarcity, this calls for solutions that can be implemented fast, are not cost-intensive, and are easy to operate and maintain. Dry toilets could pave the way to achieving SDG 6 (clean water and sanitation) by providing safe sanitation and sustainable sewage treatment."

Read more on the SGD Knowledge Hub

Improving Child Health in Nigeria Through Education, Awareness and Quality Water and Sanitation Products

"Aimcare, a Nigerian social enterprise focusing in hygiene education, has joined Business Call to Action with a commitment to facilitate access to clean water and sanitation to 200,000 low-income Nigerians in rural areas through its WaterEase platform by 2024. In addition, it will educate 300,000 low-income rural Nigerians on hygiene, sanitation and waste management practices through its Extensive Health Education programs and provide 50,000 women with maternity/birth kits. In tandem, Aimcare will provide employment opportunities to 100 low-income female distributors."

Read more on CSR Wire

Water Research Commission: Pressure Management in Real Time - eTHEKWINI Metropolitan Municipality

“A water pressure management system was implemented in the Durban CBD as part of the Non-Revenue Water Reduction Master Plan to reduce water losses as introduced by the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality's Water and Sanitation Directorate. Savings of 6 000 kl/day of potable water was achieved after the pressure management system was installed and commissioned.”

Read more about the Pressure Management in Real Time project - Page 33

 

How have these 60 Western Cape schools managed to save 15 million litres of water?

"The Western Cape is at the mercy of a water crisis that shows no signs of relenting. However, 60 schools in partnership with the education department, Bridgiot, Shoprite, the University of Stellenbosch, Cape Talk and a number of corporate sponsors are leading the way for sustainable water-saving strategies.

The University of Stellenbosch has developed a digital water metering system that monitors water consumption in real time. Consumers can use the system to detect leaks and intervene strategically to cut consumption, based on data generated by the system. The university started a company called Bridgiot to provide the systems and a water monitoring service.

Jessica Shelver, a spokesperson for Minister Debbie Schafer, revealed how Bridgiot has pro-actively installed digital smart water systems in 60 local schools. The devices have managed to save more than 15 million litres of water since last year.

There’s also been economical benefits, alongside the ecological ones. More than R700,000 has been saved through limited water usage. So how does it all work, and what else are the Western Cape Education Department doing to conserve water?"

Read more on thesouthafrican.com

6 Lessons ICT4D Practitioners Can Learn From PlayPumps Failure

Children playing on merry-go-rounds can pump ground water to a storage tank, and ads on that tank can pay for pump maintenance. ICTWorks examined the issues and learnings from the PlayPumps International project viz.:

  • High pump installation cost
  • Cheaper competing pump technology
  • Complexity of pumping mechanism
  • Lack of spare parts networks
  • Improper community placement
  • Reliance on volunteer labour

 

Read more: 6 Lessons ICT4D Practitioners Can Learn From PlayPumps Failure

Water Wise - Rand Water Foundation

"'Water Wise' is Rand Water's environmental brand. It is a campaign aimed at increasing awareness of the need to value water and to use it wisely. South Africa is a water stressed country, and the water resources are under tremendous pressure from a growing population, ongoing development, pollution, wetland destruction, alien invasive plants and the effects of global warming.

The amount of water available for use remains the same, and despite plans to increase storage capacity through the building of new dams or water transfer schemes, predictions are that the demand for water will outstrip supply by 2025. The only answer to this dilemma lies in changing people's attitude and thus their behaviour to use water more wisely, and in this regard Rand Water’s “Water Wise” campaign is visionary.

The campaign has been forging partnerships and developing relationships for over a decade, bringing the “Water Wise” message to Gauteng and South Africa."

Read more about the Water Wise Campaign

 

Mvula – Improving Water Supply and Sanitation

"Mvula Trust is the largest Non-Governmental Organisation supporting Water and Sanitation Development in South Africa. We operate from a national office in Johannesburg as well as from six regional offices in North West, Limpopo, KwaZulu Natal (2 offices) Eastern Cape (3 offices) Free state and Mpumalanga.

The Mvula Trust won a WISA award for sustainability at Nhlungwane. It was a local water supply project (built around 1994/5) including a borehole, reticulation and standpipes- managed by local committee, consisting mainly of women, who collected a small contribution from each household for maintainance of the system. After ten years the pump was still functioning and well maintained, with surplus funds in  the community operation and maintenance account. For ten years the community was independent in respect to project maintanence and did not require municipal support. The implementation of the free-basic water policy altered the system and the Mzinyathi Mununicipality had to seek ways of remunerating and keeping on the capacity that was built in the project.

Read more about The Mvula Trust

 

Water stress: why integrated management matters

"In 2018, the UN Environment-DHI Partnership, a UN Environment centre of expertise dedicated to improving the management, development and use of freshwater resources, launched the report Progress On Integrated Water Resources Management, published under the UN-Water Integrated Monitoring Initiative for SDG 6.

While the vast majority of countries, 80 per cent, have laid the foundations for integrated water resources management, the focus must now shift to implementation, says the report. 'Progress has been made, but more needs to be done,' it notes."

Read more in this article by United Nations Environment Programme

 

Relating One Water to the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals

"Concurrent with UN efforts on addressing global sustainability, the U.S. Water Alliance in 2016 released “One Water Roadmap: The Sustainable Management of Life’s Most Essential Resource,” which states: 

'The idea of an integrated systems approach to water is not new. Its full-scale implementation, however, has yet to be realized. There are many signs that water management in the U.S. is entering another great era of change and innovation. 

All around the country we are seeing silo-busting examples of integrated and inclusive approaches to water resource management. These approaches exemplify the view that all water has value and should be managed in a sustainable, inclusive, integrated way. We call this perspective One Water. While our focus is water, our goals are thriving local economies, community vitality and healthy ecosystems.'"

Read more about the One Water Roadmap here

The litter traps and solid waste pollution of the Hennops River – a race against the coming rains

"In October 2019, with a group of amazing river warriors and volunteers from the local community, we set up two beautiful litter traps. Litter traps are like functional artworks that enhance and clean the areas around them. They can also assist to provide a livelihood for the local people, who have been helping to put them up. The new nets will be game-changing and offer a chance to fight back against the overwhelming pollution."

Read the article on Daily Maverick

Dry Toilets: An Approach to Provide Safe Sanitation and Sustainable Sewage Treatment?

"According to the 2019 World Water Development Report (WWDR), only two out of five people across the globe had access to safely managed sanitation services in 2015 (World Water Assessment Programme (WWAP 2019)). Combined with the increasing risk of water scarcity, this calls for solutions that can be implemented fast, are not cost-intensive, and are easy to operate and maintain. Dry toilets could pave the way to achieving SDG 6 (clean water and sanitation) by providing safe sanitation and sustainable sewage treatment."

Read more on the SGD Knowledge Hub

The P&G Children’s Safe Drinking Water Program

"The P&G Children's Safe Drinking Water (CSDW) Program started as a non-profit initiative in 2004. Through a diverse network of more than 150 partners, CSDW provides clean drinking water using the P&G Purifier of Water packets and helps raise awareness of the water crisis. Simply providing clean, drinkable water can reduce the risk of disease and death by about 50 percent. P&G is now accelerating its efforts to help provide clean drinking water to even more people by aiming to deliver 25 billion liters by 2025."

Read more in the National Geographic article: Water Champions

Read about the programme from a South African context:  P&G and Game's water-supply partnership delivers over 2m litres in 2017

Unilever: Working with suppliers & farmers to manage water use

"Across most of the world, over 70% of freshwater is used for agriculture. A lack of water can reduce yields and crop quality, or destroy whole harvests. This can have a devastating impact, especially for smallholder farmers. Water scarcity is already a major challenge for farmers in many of the countries where we source our crops. Climate change will make this worse, as more sectors and countries feel the impacts of rising temperatures, more frequent droughts and unpredictable changes in rainfall patterns.

Water scarcity and climate change are major risks to our business, because of the potential impact on the supply and cost of the ingredients we use in our products. So we’re taking action to help farmers in our supply chain adapt to the effects of climate change and use water more efficiently to improve crop yields, while also using less water. We focus on water-scarce countries and our most water-intensive crops, such as tomatoes."

Read more on unilever.com

Social entrepreneurship improving access to drinking water in Cambodia

"Over the last 15 years, GRET has been supporting small water operators in rural villages in Cambodia to improve access to drinking water. Since 2012, GRET has been supporting the development of a services centre called iSEA (Innovative Services for Engineering and Advisory), which is dedicated to these companies. Following World Water Day on 22 March last, on the theme of “Water and Jobs” and the institutionalisation of iSEA in the form of a company governed by Cambodian law, GRET looks back over this social entrepreneurship experience and its contribution to access to drinking water."

Read more about the project on gret.org

IBM: Turning lives around with water

"Today, water scarcity is a global crisis. Not just in Africa or India, but from the USA to the UK. To help address this growing problem, IBM is applying smart technologies at scale with purpose and knowledge to monitor water resources that supply water to people living in arid areas in Northern Kenya. Through a cloud-based Water Management as a Service Platform, IBM is helping to improve the management of water resources."

Read more about IBM Smart Water Management

Water: Facts and Futures - Rethinking South Africa’s Water Future

"WWF-South Africa’s Freshwater programmes have been working in South African catchments for nearly two decades. As an independent, science-based, environmental NGO we are continually learning about South Africa’s water resources, the many public institutions that influence their governance, and how the private sector can play a stronger, positive role in responding to increasing water risks. WWF-SA is particularly focused on the role of nature in securing healthy water resources, essential for our economic survival and growth. Nature, water, food and people are inseparably entwined in our vulnerable landscapes. South Africans increasingly want to know the facts behind our water system, and whether we are headed in the right direction for a sustainable future with enough water to meet our needs.

Water: Facts and Futures introduces the reader to the interesting facts behind the state of our nation’s water. This is the tip of the iceberg, and we encourage you to dig deeper in the many comprehensive sources of information available. We have also shared some signposts for the future, some of the success stories that South Africans can be proud of. These are examples that can lead us to a sustainable water future."

Read the full WWF report here

Water Research Commission: Water Loss Programme - Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality

“The NMBM embarked on a large scale Water Conservation and Water Demand Management programme in 2009. The objective has been to reduce Non-Revenue Water by 15% within the next ten years. However, the severity of the recent drought in the Eastern Cape has forced the Municipality to intensify the reduction of NRW and water wastage.” 

Read more about the water demand management programme (Page 9)

  

Worsening Water Quality Reducing Economic Growth by a Third in Some Countries: World Bank

"Quality Unknown: The Invisible Water Crisis shows, with new data and methods, how a combination of bacteria, sewage, chemicals, and plastics can suck oxygen from water supplies and transform water into poison for people and ecosystems. To shed light on the issue, the World Bank assembled the world’s largest database on water quality gathered from monitoring stations, remote sensing technology, and machine learning. The report finds that a lack of clean water limits economic growth by one-third. It calls for immediate global, national, and local-level attention to these dangers which face both developed and developing countries. "

Read more in the article on worldbank.org

Water Research Commission: Water Conservation and Water Demand Management Interventions at the Municipal Level in South Africa

 Image Water Conservation and Water Demand Management Interventions at the Municipal Level in South Africa "As the demand continues to increase against a backdrop of limited water resources, higher pollution loads and at an ever increasing cost to the user, the management of municipal water supply, by authorities throughout the world, is increasingly focusing on water use efficiency, water loss and water demand management. Water Conservation and Water Demand Management (WC/WDM) offer a viable option to create required efficiencies amongst existing users, whilst ensuring that there is capacity for new water users. Where there is a limited supply of available surface water WC/WDM represents an effective strategy for creating efficiencies, using the resource more effectively, as well as avoiding water wastage and water loss. This then allows for the extension of supply to new consumers."

Read the Case Study here

 

South Africa’s Environmental Programmes

This publication, issued by the South African Government's Department of Environmental Affairs,  explains how  natural resource management is being supported through various public employment programmes.  One of these programmes, the globally acclaimed 'Working for Water',  utilises a variety of management strategies to counteract the effects of invasive alien vegetation on things like biological diversity, water quantity and quality, and the effective functioning of natural ecosystems. In some areas they have implemented a biocontrol programme that introduces host-specific fungi and insects in order to suppress invasive plant species. They have also successfully implemented a pilot project in the Eastern Cape that uses invasive alien biomass and bush encroachment biomass to generate electricity.

Read more about the Environmental Programmes 

Integrated Water Resources Management - World Vision

“Integrated water resources management (IWRM) is a sustainable approach seeking to address the socio-economic needs of all stakeholders in a watershed, preserving the environment and considering the needs of future generations. This is critical to the sustainability and resilience of rural communities.”

Read more from World Vision

 

 

IBM: Turning lives around with water

"Today, water scarcity is a global crisis. Not just in Africa or India, but from the USA to the UK. To help address this growing problem, IBM is applying smart technologies at scale with purpose and knowledge to monitor water resources that supply water to people living in arid areas in Northern Kenya. Through a cloud-based Water Management as a Service Platform, IBM is helping to improve the management of water resources."

Read more about IBM Smart Water Management

Addressing The Global Water Crisis Through Social Enterprise

This article talks about how the best way to  impact the global water crisis is through social enterprise and emphasizes the fact that the most effective programmes are those that empower individuals to create change within their communities. The author goes on to encourage people wishing to help minimise the impact of the water crisis to donate, host information sharing and fundraising events, and support social impact driven businesses wherever possible.

Read the article by The Well Essentials

 

Old Mutual Water-Saving Initiatives

In August 2018, Old Mutual launched their in-house water filtration plant at their MutualPark offices in Cape Town - the first corporate based waste-to-drinking Water Filtration Plant in South Africa. The 166 000m² office ,which accomodates over 9 000 employees and contractors, now operates off the water grid. The Water Filtration Plant is currently Mutualpark’s main source of water and has the capacity to produce between 650 000 and 800 000 litres a day.

Old Mutual has, however,  been implementing effective water-saving initiatives since the beginning of 2016 and water consumption at Mutualpark was already reduced by 30% prior to the launch of the Water Filtration Plant.

Read more about Old Mutual's water saving initiatives here:

Old Mutual Cape Town Will Go “Off the Water Grid” With Launch of Water Filtration Plant (Old Mutual Press Release)

Old Mutual to help save 15 million liters of water per month (CapeTalk)

 

A List of 10 big CSR Projects in WASH Sector in India

"WASH is an acronym that stands for Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene. It is a matter of importance as universal, affordable and sustainable access to WASH is a key public health issue within the international development and is a focus of the sixth goal of SDG. The government of India, through ‘Swachh Bharat Abhiyan’, is implementing the program in the communities and schools across the country. The Program is partnering with private enterprises and non- profits in an attempt to make the initiative successful. This article brings forward the initiatives of major companies and ventures who have contributed to making the initiative successful."

Read the article on CSRBOX

Nedbank's Water Stewardship and Conservation Commitment

"Nedbank believes that the only way for South Africa to deal effectively with the country’s water challenges and to limit the impact is through a shared commitment to good water stewardship. This means that all South Africans, from government and businesses to communities and individuals, have to accept the responsibility they have to conserve and protect the country’s water resources and to reduce the nation’s collective water demand to sustainable levels. In this regard Nedbank is committed to leading by example. In line with our purpose to use our financial expertise for the good of society we have built an effective water stewardship approach using our three sustainability pillars of managing our own impact, leading through collaboration, and facilitating sustainability through our products and finance solutions."

Read more about Nedbank's Water Stewardship commitments here:

Nedbank is committed to good water stewardship (Nedbank)

Nedbank furthers its water stewardship commitment releasing 1 billion litres of water annually for the drought-stricken Western Cape (Nedbank)

Why Nedbank Has Invested More Than R264 Million in Conservation Projects (Global Citizen)

R25m boost for water, biodiversity in EC (Grocott's Mail)

 

Secure water future for South Africa through an innovative sanitation market

"We all know that water stress is South Africa’s problem and that in the next few decades we will reach a point where our water availability will be in a deficit — meaning our consumption is going to outstrip our water availability.  Traditional and conventional interventions are necessary such as new dams, water reuse, efficiency etcetera. However, we should stop having a rear-view approach to solving our future challenges: now is the time to be radical.  It is time to end the madness and introduce the Sanitation Transformative Initiative (Saniti) to the sanitation environment.

We use nearly half of our treated freshwater to move human waste away from settlements where sewerage networks have been installed.  This is the where a great opportunity exists.  Sanitia offers new solutions that utilise less or no water and are completely off the sewerage grid.  This can effectively put back 40% to 50% of freshwater back into the system and eliminate all the downstream problems associated with conventional wastewater management. "

Read more in Mail and Guardian

The Msunduzi Duct pollution monitoring, maintenance and community education project

"The Msunduzi Duct pollution monitoring, maintenance and community education project had four key purposes

  • To clear sewer lines and eradicate alien invasive plants
  • To monitor the sewer lines and report spillages
  • To reveal long abandoned or neglected manholes that have not been seen for long periods of time
  • And to educate communities and schools about waste water and sanitation.

Data gathered by the project team and reflected throughout the print report and most notably in the ‘Stories of change” section suggest that not only have the outcomes been met but in many cases these have been exceeded. Education and infrastructure development together have been integral to the success of the project."

Read more about the project on duct.org.za

Emerging Social Enterprise Ecosystems in East and South African Countries

"The development of Social Enterprises (SEs) is an essential element of any country strategy to meet the Sustainable Development Goals. This study makes a unique contribution by helping SEs understand the environment in which they work and by offering governments and external funding agencies an evidence base for creating a more supportive ecosystem in which SEs can have a development impact at scale, especially at the Base of the economic Pyramid."

Read the report here

From cradle to grave: How Levi's is tackling water sustainability

"Levi’s global vice president of sustainability Michael Kobori joined us at the factory and shared some interesting statistics that the company's global team uncovered following a full life cycle assessment of their products. Shockingly, and you might want to put down your tea cup for this one, a single pair of 501's, they discovered, requires 3,781 litres of water from cradle to grave. Needless to say, there were a few horrified gasps around the room on hearing this. 

Of the 3,781 litres, more than 66% is used to grow the cotton, roughly 20% is used by you and I as consumers, while manufacturing utilises only about 13%. With this knowledge, Levi's now knows where to concentrate its water-saving efforts. Sharing the brand's global approach, Kobori highlighted Levi's work with the Better Cotton Initiative (BCI) which teaches farmers how to use both less water and chemicals while still producing greater yields. Last year, he noted, 68% of all Levi's products were made using various sustainable cotton initiatives, including BCI, and in 2020 its goal is 100%. "

Read the full article on Bizcommunity

A delicate balance: Water scarcity in South Africa

“Improve water quality infrastructure. This includes water treatment plants and drainage systems that pollute freshwater systems and storage dams. It’s understandable that the supply of water has taken centre stage, but the general neglect of surface water quality is an issue that can’t be ignored any longer. Only a third of South Africa’s rivers are in good condition while the cost of restoring degraded river systems is increasingly prohibitive.

South Africa’s developmental agenda will be well served by ensuring a reliable and secure water management system. Water security helps to reduce poverty, advances education, supports productivity and increases living standards. Most of all an improved quality of life, especially for the poor and most vulnerable, will result from good water governance.”

Read the Southern African report here

 

Sanitation and Water Entrepreneurship Pact

Sanitation and Water Entrepreneurship Pact are a global network that supports entrepreneurs in realising the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 6 - access to water and sanitation for all. Their members support the development and transfer of impact-oriented, affordable water and sanitation solutions; they offer practice-oriented expertise in water and sanitation enterprises; Engage with political and economic leaders to crease entrepreneurial ecosystems, and also help to design financing options that will attract investment.

Read more about the Sanitation and Water Entrepreneurship Pact here

Providing Clean Drinking Water to India’s Rural Poor Using a Social Enterprise Model.

United for Hope are an NGO, working in India, with the aim to bringing reliably clean water to rural areas. They  combine locally adapted water technology with extensive WASH (Water,  Sanitation and Hygiene) education programmes and also provide support to local staff by providing them with specific go-to-market strategies. The fresh water is charged for at a nominal price, in order to cover costs and to enable job creation. So, although they opperate on a for-profit basis, all of the profits are fed back into local social projects, maintainance and job creation.

Read more about the project here

 

WWF: Clearing Alien Vegatation

"There are several clearing programmes, both government and private, that are attempting to eradicate alien plants countrywide. But once the wood is cut down it is often left behind, causing damage to river systems in flood and posing a fire risk. A partnership between WWF-SA, NCC and Danish partner Linddana in the Riviersonderend catchment uses a wood chipper to demonstrate how value can be created out of ‘waste’ wood generated from clearing alien plants – while also freeing up more water. Most of the farmers in this area produce export apples and livestock."

 

Read more: WWF: Clearing Alien Vegatation

Innovative Decentralised Water Solutions Developed by Social Enterprises

"This blog draws on the findings from research conducted on innovative social enterprise models at the Base of the Pyramid for the World Bank Social Enterprise Innovations team by Endeva and Ashley Insight. The research and corresponding case studies are available on the World Bank and OECD’s Innovation Policy Platform.

Clean and safe drinking water is available in most urban and rural environments. This can be bottled or bagged purified water, water from protected wells or springs, or indeed boiled or home-filtered water from a public or private utility company tap. Why, then are so many people lacking easy access to drinking water in many countries? I believe that the underlying reason why clean and safe water isn’t available to everyone is because the mainstream public and private water providers believe that it is too expensive to do so and/or that they won’t make money providing a low-cost option. The great news is that there is a growing number of social enterprises proving them wrong! "
 

SA must invest in wastewater technology to curb water crisis, says analyst

"Minister of Water and Sanitation Lindiwe Sisulu urged South Africans, at a media briefing on Monday, to use water sparingly in Gauteng and other regions while the government works on interventions to avoid a drought situation. Bongani Bingwa talks to Water Research Commission Chief Executive Officer Dhesigen Naidoo, who says the government knew as early as the 1980s that it wasn't making the right infrastructure decisions regarding water."

Listen to the interview on Radio 702

Read more examples of this model of intervention in our category on Building and Maintaining Infrastructure

Hippo Water Roller Project

"Hippo Roller, a South African-made drum to transport water, allows users to transport five times as much water as a 20-litre bucket. Instead of carrying the standard 20-litre bucket on your head, the Hippo Roller is rolled on the ground. They have been distributed in more than 29 countries.

More than 50,000 Hippo Rollers have been distributed in more than 29 countries, changing the lives of millions of people, according to Play Your Part ambassador Darren Smith."

Read more: Hippo Water Roller Project

#WaterCrisis: Leaking pipes lead to huge water waste

"The Western Cape wastes massive amounts of water through leaking pipes and other infrastructure problems. And with day zero looming for water, the possibility of queuing at water tanks might become a reality, said Greenpeace’s former director, Kumi Naidoo."

"The provincial department of tourism, economic development and agriculture said it was estimated that a total of 7.5 million cubic metres of water was lost last year."

Read the full article on IOL

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